Autonomy or Domination? Two Faces of Differentiated Integration

Chris Lord has published a new article on differentiated integration in the EU. When is it a source of autonomy and when is it a source of domination?

Abstract 

When is differentiated integration (DI) of the European Union a source of autonomy and when is it a source of domination? Much depends on what collective goods member state democracies seek through integration. Club goods often require member state democracies to form DIs of their choice. Public goods and common resource goods may, in contrast, require limits on DI if member state democracies are to meet their own obligations to their own publics to secure rights, justice, non-domination and democracy itself. Those differences are important to understanding how European democracies should be ‘internationally ordered’ if they are to sustain internal forms of political autonomy. They also demonstrate the importance of DI to the autonomy of member state democracies in associating together beyond the state; in defining obligations within the state; and in securing the greatest autonomy of each European democracy compatible with the greatest possible autonomy of all European democracies.

Full info 

Christopher Lord
Autonomy or Domination? Two Faces of Differentiated Integration

In: Swiss Political Science Review, 2021
DOI: 10.1111/spsr.12472

Published Aug. 26, 2021 12:48 PM - Last modified Aug. 26, 2021 12:48 PM